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 NOTTFOBehind the ScenesAlternate Scenes Share to:  Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Google+ Share to Pinterest Share to Tumblr Share to MySpace Share to Email



"Isn't is possible that you've imagined all this?"
-Dr. Alan Lanier
The Wessex Hotel's Doctor, to Elaine






Alternate Scenes:
During the movie, when the doctor asks if it was possible that Elaine might have imagined the murder, he is shown from afar, with all of the characters in the frame. On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, he is shown close-up. He sounds almost the same, with maybe a hint more sarcasm in his voice. The look on his face shows that he definitely thinks she crazy. All of this is a reverse pyschological ploy to divert attention away from themselves by passing Elaine off as a nutjob.

The Doctor's dialogue changes in this scene as well, altering by the final words of his dispassionate prose:


Final Version     Alternate Version
Dr. Lanier: Isn't it possible that you've imagined
   this whole thing?
Dr. Lanier: Isn't it possible that you've imagined
   all this?



Alternate Scenes:
Mrs. Beecher watches with fear as the shadow of the axe-weilding maniac comes around the corner. On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, we see the same scene, although this time the lighting casts a creepier feel, Mrs. Beecher is no longer in the frame, and we see the axe gleaming in the ambient lighting, rather than just seeing it's shadow as it is coming around the corner.

Final Version     Alternate Version



Alternate Scenes:
On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, when introducing John Karlen, there is a shot of the Sargeant that has been flipped from its original state.

Final Version     Alternate Version



Alternate Scenes:
In the USA Network World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, we see the 13th Floor's Room #9 from a slightly different angle. Literally. The first thing that we notice that is different is that the antique, and undoubtably original number "9", perfectly centered, and adorning the door to the room numbered 9, is seen straight on. The closest that we come to seeing the room number in the film itself is during two shots seen of it as the Sargeant is holding the door open. It is on the door, visible to the Sargeant's right. But it definitely isn't as clear and legible as it is now.

The second difference is that in the film, after the door bursts open, the camera is inside of the room, behind the small table, facing the Sargeant, who is peering into the room, looking for signs of movement. It then cuts to the Sargeant's view into the room - looking at the fireplace and window. In the USA Network World Permiere Movie's one minute preview, however, as soon as the door bursts open, we see the shot of the fireplace and window. It is a lot darker than the shot that wound up in the film. It was also filmed at a slightly different angle. While the images appear to be almost identical, pay attention to the fireplace mantle, on the right side of the screen. In the film, it runs downhill to the right at a slightly larger angle than it does in the shot used in the film's preview, which appears to have been shot more straight on, rather than filmed on an angle.


Alternate Version  



Final Version  



Musical Note:
On the international releases, the English soundtrack was completely edited out so that a different language version could be overdubbed into it's place. All music is added back in, thus making it more pronounced and defined. We hear the music and foriegn speakers without the music being blended into talking or inane chatter. The only music not edited out of any foreign versions only to be reinserted, is Ragtime Piano - aka the Wessex Death March - the signature turn-of-the-century Joplin-styled ragtime piano theme played from an old timey wax cylinder gramophone. This is the reason why the music during the 13th Floor sequences sound a little different when comparing the US release with international versions: Because the soundtrack is removed and then edited back in on the international versions, the music appears more clear and defined, as it isn't clashing or trying to override "Ragtime Piano". This makes it sound slightly more ominous.

A lot of people are under the impression that during certain televised airings of the movie, especially during 1996, "Ragtime Piano" was changed due to temporary copyright issues, and that the temporary replacement music is a little creepier. To end the debate, NOTTFO asked Jay Gruska, the mastermind who composed all of the music for the film. And according to our Interview with Jay Gruska, score writer Jay Gruska states,

"Well, since I wrote that piece and don't know anything about a replacement--I'm curious as well. Why would there be copyright issues if I composed it???"

- Jay Gruska  

There we have it. He doesn't know anything about a replacement, so that means, in all confidence, there weren't any replacements. Chances are it's just misconceptions based on the film's lack of showings and airings, as during the '90s the movie only played once, and if lucky, twice, a year.





Cut!:

On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, the very first thing that we see is the Wessex Hotel, shrouded in darkness. But all of a sudden, there is a flash of lightning, and the Hotel is illuminated with a ghastly glow. This scene does not appear anywhere within the movie, but it gives such a quaint and charming structure as the Wessex an ominous and ghoulish feel.




Cut!:

On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, there is a shot of the hotel porter that does not appear in the film. He is wearing his dark blue uniform with gold trim and gold rimmed porter's hat that is typical of his uniform, and standing next to a bellhop cart. He is smiling, devilishly, and it's assumed he is up to no good...

Cut!:
On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, we see a demonic goateed figure (part of the concrete carving on the frieze that wraps around the Wessex Hotel between it's 12th and 14th floors and the same one the film title becomes superimposed upon on Page 2), shrouded in darkness. But all of a sudden, there is a flash of lightning, and the carving is illuminated with a ghastly glow. This scene does not appear anywhere within the movie, but it gives already demonic imagery even more terrifying appeal.




Cut!:
It is likely that there may have been a cut scene from the City Engineer's Office. Elaine will later refer to the young engineer as Gail Myers. Nowhere in this exchange is Gail's name given out, so unless there was a small name plaquard sitting on Gail's desk that stated her name, there has to be an exchange that was eventually cut out of the movie. The same is true for the fact that Gail knows Elaine's room number. Elaine never told Gail what room she was in. Unless of course this was covered in an exchange not included in the film. Either that or she called the hotel prior to her arrival, which is rather doubtful.

Cut!:

Elaine: Help me!

On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, there is a shot of Elaine, peering through one of the windows in the Wessex Hotel, screaming for somebody to help her. This scene does not appear anywhere within the movie, but it's most natural placement would be during the epic chase sequence, as there are windows that Elaine will pass by as she is running... The only thing that can contradict this, is that there is daylight flowing through the windows during the chase sequence, implying that it is earlier in the day, while the pictures here depict darkness.






Cut!:
On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, immediately after the cut scene above, through the light being cast upon the wall, we see a silhouette of a man holding what appears to be an axe. The axe is raised, poised to strike. It comes down, swinging, and upon impact we hear a loud boom followed by a scream:

Elaine (?): Ahhhhh!

The almost 2-second long scream that is used here, comes immediately after Elaine yelling "Help me!" in the cut scene above. The immediate juxtaposition of the two sounds, sound very much as if it could have come from Elaine. it doesn't appear anywhere within the film, but it definitely comes from Elaine.


Cut!:
On the USA World Premiere Movie's one minute preview, after the shot from above, of the shadow of the axe-weilding maniac coming around the corner, there is a scream:

Unknown: Ahhhhh!

It is unknown who is screaming in the background, but it sounds as if it could be the character listed in the credits as Man 1. He is the person that gets murdered, right in front of Elaine's eyes. She was told it was a dream but she just doesn't quite believe that. The scream doesn't appear within the film, however, and the voice appears slightly unrecognizable, so it's hard to tell who is screaming for sure.


Cut!:

The picture at left is a promotional photo of the Sargeant, taken for press release purposes. The room is very well illuminated, much more so than how it appears in the film. The left hand side of the fireplace is seen to the Sargeant's right. The scimitar to the Sargeant's left, to the right of the bookcase, can be seen with much more detail, as can the spines of the books residing in the bookcase. The Sargeant is going for a "sexy" look, posing with his handgun, deeply intent on spinning the chair around and shooting the killer. The Sargeant in the film, however, looks a little more reserved, undoubtably nervous, and anxiously hoping for the best. He is also looking straight, and not to his left.

Cut!:

The picture at left is another promotional photo of the Sargeant, taken for press release purposes. The room is very well illuminated, much more so than how it appears in the film. This photo was taken in the same vacinity as the promotional photo alluded to above. We can now better see a small crocodile statue in front of the bookcase. Its mouth is open, and its sharp, vicious teeth are showing. This is yet another decorum item used to help add to the overall demonicness of the Wessex Hotel's Altar Room. The Sargeant, looking more to his right than he does during the film, looks as if he is giving his best scared but still ready to kill the killer look. This picture was also used on the back cover boxart on the film's German release.




Version Differences:
While they are perhaps more Cultural Differences than Version Differences, the pictures below come in the form of back cover boxart. The first is used on the film's Spanish release, while the second is used on the film's Sweedish and French releases. These all show Elaine from a different angle, and with a different facial expression than that used within the film itself. Notice that the Sweedish and French versions have been flipped.

Spanish Version     Sweedish & French Versions



Version Differences:
While they are perhaps more Cultural Differences than Version Differences, the picture below comes in the form of back cover boxart, used on the film's German and French releases. We see a picture of Sargeant Madden, after he has fallen on top of the elevator. His face is still bloodied, and his hair is just as ruffled, but he is being shown at an entirely different angle. This angle, different from any used in the film, shows the Sargeant more perpendicular to the camera view. The picture also shows a little more of the Sargeant's shoulders, as well as his white shirt. The picture possesses much more of a gold hue, as the lighting effects are significantly different, as well.

German Version     French Version